What will the legal world look like after AI becomes more competent?

What will the legal world look like after AI becomes more competent?

Will all contractual disputes be instantly adjudicated? Will businesses save money by opting for the ultimate arbitration - an AI decision? Will human lawyers still write briefs and make arguments?

I imagine that all juries, civil and criminal, will still be all human, and therefore I think we will still want or need human lawyers in the courtroom. But for all the out-of-court stuff, will lawyers become obsolete?

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Edit

    Will human lawyers still write briefs and make arguments *for an AI judge*?

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    its going to cause a massive shitstorm as people rush to adopt AI

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Normies
      Glues to AI and believes all AI does and addicted to the decision making
      >Lowwits
      Hates AI and curses the world, violence and drug use goes up while they glue themselves to religions
      >Highwits
      Damning AI and speaking against it, moving more towards arts and the trades and out of academia proper.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        real highwits are sociopaths that hate normie society and abuse it to make money. A few hundred years ago, when the industrial revolution began, highwits would've built the coal mine you would've fucked up your lungs in while working. Highwits are extreme psychopaths that use their genius level IQ to enslave retards, like we do with dumb animals that we turn into food.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You can't use an AI judge because it's inherently a black box. You cannot know if it makes a decision based on rule of law or not because not even its designers know how it works

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Interesting point. But how do you know a judge is basing a decision off the law and not some other criteria? Humans have biases, motivations, etc. It happens all the time with judges.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Most civilized countries have law about the right to be tried by your equals, and an AI will never be that. having said that, AI is already used in the discovery process and in determining relevant case law, important and time consuming and therefore also expensive parts in preparing the case.

        >But how do you know a judge is basing a decision off the law and not some other criteria?
        We already know the human judges are flawed, even in the most banal ways:
        https://phys.org/news/2011-04-early-lunch.html
        It is also well known that pretty women receive far more lenient decisions by male judges, while female judges are unsympathetic against female victims such as rape victims.

        t.Patent attorney

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Patent attorney? That's not even real lawyer stuff

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Patent attorney?
            Yup. And I am not the only one around here.
            >That's not even real lawyer stuff
            My salary is sufficiently real that I just don't care.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Salary, city, billable hours requirements?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Salary, city,
                This is a sufficiently small and tight knit profession that such information would doxx me immediately. Salary is quite comfortable and there is also income from being a partner.
                >billable hours requirements?
                We aim for 70 percent. I train a lot of my younger colleagues and work on getting new clients, so my requirement is about 40 - 50 percent.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Okay but how many hours?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Normal working days here are 7.5 hours, so the aim is about 5 hours. We can never reach 100 percent since we spend a lot of time keeping up to date with all changes in rules and regulations and interpretations, across multiple jurisdictions.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                No way. 5 billables a day, so 25 per week? 100 per month? That's crazy low. In jealousy if that's true!

                I used to do a minimum of 140, but that was low - the real expectation was a minimum of 160.

                Now I'm in house so no more billables

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                A lot of companies like to work people into the ground. We don't, and I think the real reason is that our salaries are rather low, but still comfortable. I found some statistics here, does this match your experience?
                https://fellowsandassociates.com/filestore/Documents/FellowsSalarySurvey2022.pdf

                Several of my colleagues left for in house positions (and I suspect salaries were part of why they went), and I have been offered positions too. Those were in super high risk startups, so I declined politely. Come to think of it, quite a lot of my clients are in the high risk category...

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Interesting point. But how do you know a judge is basing a decision off the law and not some other criteria? Humans have biases, motivations, etc. It happens all the time with judges.

      The law doesn't narrow things down enough for a deterministic decision process. A human judge will deal with a million ambiguities and make a million value judgments before handing down a verdict on a complex case. A human judge can rely on his human sensibilities and hopefully some human wisdom. Expecting a mindless, inhuman machine to do the job borders of severe mental illness.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      AI isn't a black box you dumb retard.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The legal world is designed to have enough loopholes to get whoever off that the system wants off and throw the book at whoever they want to throw the book at. AI judges would learnt his behavior as well and more efficiently railroad anyone who is a system disrupter.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Basically, if we let AI control any area of our life it will become logical instead of
    circus so there is literally zero incentive for everyone strongly benefiting right now to do it.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >What will the legal world look like after AI becomes more competent?
    Exactly the same.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I remember reading an L. E. Modesitt short story about a lawyer in the future that develops an algorithm that controls trial factors that are in your control (certain weird rules about dates, judges, whatnot) that guarantees a certain percentage of winning. His sister who is like a do-gooder pro bono civil rights attorney tells him that organized crime is just going to buy it and use to their advantage if he does this. The story ends with organized crime buying it and using it towards their advantage.

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