Theoretically Could AI do a pretty decent job at predicting which number would hit next on an electronic roulette wheel?

Theoretically… Could AI do a pretty decent job at predicting which number would hit next on an electronic roulette wheel?
Is ChatGPT capable of doing something like that?

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  1. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Only if they had the source code of that particular machine.

  2. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    There's a real roulette wheel in those things... is it not totally random?

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      It is supposed to be but each wheel has more or less variance due to physical abnormalities
      This has been exploited in the past
      Realistically, it is effectively random and OP has a gambling addiction

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        It’s true I do have a gambling addiction. But also the wheels do have some sort of bias to them.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          But not so much that you won't be left broken again

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            These machines are perfect for exploitation because they use real wheels, but the spin and the ball release are always the same. After a while you start to see that there might be some sort of pattern.

            • 7 months ago
              Anonymous

              Thats folks, is your brain on addiction.

            • 7 months ago
              Anonymous

              >After a while you start to see that there might be some sort of pattern.
              Sure, if you have the data of a billion rounds from the same wheel you might improve your chances by half a percent.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      just use the current state of the universe as input and simulate the output

  3. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Dumbest thread on BOT

  4. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    yeah, free tier chatgpt will allow you to build an infinite money machine

  5. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    ChatGPT regurgitates what it's seen on the internet. If enough people typed 2+2 = 5, it would answer that if you asked what 2+2 equals. It doesn't think, it doesn't know. For it to predict this, it would need to have a statistically significant part of the internet openly telling you how to game these machines.

  6. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    happened. MIT group, led by a lecturer
    i think they got .. i recall reading it - they got something like 200k outta it
    ws a lot simpler than 'generative ai' ..
    they used a processor and an observer. the observer was behind the player, observing the wheel. based on simple statistical prediction of the balance of the wheel, based on the results. .. they had tuned their software using a wheel at home. he would pocket click to transmit to a receiving station strapped to the leg of the gambler, to indicate the most probable #
    it is possible. its all described in
    Bringing Down the House: The Inside Story of Six M.I.T. Students Who Took Vegas for Millions
    book
    another one for BOT tech book recommend

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIT_Blackjack_Team

      got it wrong

      another system. that book = blackjack
      but

      Roulette-wheel predictor
      MIThril, a borglab production. Richard W. DeVaul, Jonathan Gips, Michael Sung, Sandy Pentland
      A device to predict where the roulette ball will land, increasing the bettor's odds. Augments the predictive powers of the bettor.
      The system was a cigarette-pack sized analog computer with 4 push buttons. A data-taker would use the buttons to indicate the speed of the roulette wheel, and the computer would then send tones via radio to a bettor's hearing aid. The system was invented in 1961. It and its successors were the first to produce better than even odds on a gambling game.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        mit did have a system for roulette and i think it is in that book
        its a whole book about the roulette attempt
        The Ritz team wasn’t the first. In 2001, a Hungarian, Laszlo Kovaks, was caught doing the same thing in the Star City Casino in Australia. And as far back as 1961, the same Edward O. Thorp of blackjack fame invented what was probably the first wearable computer. After a lot of research, he was able to predict the fall of the ball to one-eighth of the wheel. Another group of MIT students followed in his footsteps in 1976 and took the project a step further, but never capitalized on it. That was 45 years ago. With today’s technology and computing power, the hurdles that the early pioneers faced just aren’t there anymore.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          wrong paste. outta here

          Edward O. Thorp studied mathematics and physics at UCLA and has applied his mathematical and scientific know-how in novel ways during his career. In the 1960s while teaching at MIT, he invented the first wearable computer as a device to predict the outcome of roulette rounds. Thorp later proved players could beat the house in blackjack by counting cards and wrote the bestselling Beat the Dealer about his findings. In 1969, Thorp created the first market-neutral hedge fund, lending his profound understanding of math to the field of investing. Thorp is an alumnus of the 1949 STS and a member of the Society’s Honorary Board.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        it was MIT. there were different attempts
        Edward O. Thorp studied mathematics and physics at UCLA and has applied his mathematical and scientific know-how in novel ways during his career. In the 1960s while teaching at MIT, he invented the first wearable computer as a device to predict the outcome of roulette rounds. Thorp later proved players could beat the house in blackjack by counting cards and wrote the bestselling Beat the Dealer about his findings. In 1969, Thorp created the first market-neutral hedge fund, lending his profound understanding of math to the field of investing. Thorp is an alumnus of the 1949 STS and a member of the Society’s Honorary Board.

        the story of that ^ is in a book. its a very good read

  7. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Could AI?
    Yeah sure, but it would be overkill you don't really need an AI you just need to understand how the ball moves and write something that handles that:
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2017/05/23/how-physicists-used-science-to-beat-the-odds-at-roulette/?sh=34b09a473c39

    >Could ChatGPT?
    No, and you sound like you're either 15 or a complete moron.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      i read that generative ai has been used to make successful but weird 'knitting patterns' it has that level of depth

  8. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Is ChatGPT capable of doing something like that?
    You don't understand random, nor chatgpt.

  9. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    My advice is to not gamble.

    Also Don't work, so you can't have money to gamble.

    No Pussy No work, No pussy No Taxes, No Pussy No Peace.

  10. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    It'd be easier to use one of those mini emps on the slots. I wouldn't do any of that though because the risk of just getting tied to a chair and getting beat up is enough to deter me.

  11. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    theoretically? theoretically.

  12. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Heh. It’s not a gamble if I know I can win. See you guys on the flip siiiiiide.

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