>system engineering. >robotics and automation. >computer science. >intelligent systems

>system engineering
>robotics and automation
>computer science
>intelligent systems
>mechatronics and information science
>cybersecurity

which one should I go with in >current year; isn't CS a tad overblown?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    me at the back

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >which one should I go with in
    the one you want to go with

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I am in mechatronics and controls. Nearly all memechatronics roles need you to be proficient in cpp or python. You can't escape it but you can get away with being a lil bit more shitty at it than your cs peers

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      wish it could be the other way around and go from cs into mechatronics

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    if you are worried about having an actual market where you can work, robotics has more future

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I did system engineering, it was effectively an applied maths degree with a minor in EE and a few comp-sci electives.
    I know C, RISC ASM, VHDL and Fourier analysis.
    I don't know what the frick a java is.
    I can make robots and prototype ASICs with FPGAs.
    I hate computers.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >information science
    College scam

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Cybersecurity for sure.
    As long as there is a shit code there will be vulnerabilities, and this is where infosec comes in.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      lol cybersec is a fricking meme now. you won't be able to do shit about insecure software, they don't teach anything about software in most cybersec degrees. just gay ass threat models or compliance . 95% of cybersec gays are basically business analyst no coders now

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      cybersecurity degrees are generally less respected than computer science degrees, besides being less versatile

      if you want to work on infosec you should still get a computer science degree. Having one will set you apart from most people in infosec, who have little to no software development skills or experience

      also infosec is relatively boring and only very large corporations and government orgs even have meaningful cybersecurity departments. security is an afterthought in the nimble little startups that will be fun for you to join right out of college before you have a family and all that

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Do Cysec if you like money. Should also be pretty safe career until you are a senior and can do whatever the frick you want anyways.
    If you want the full engineering skillset for prototyping do Robotics. You get some MechEng, some EE, and a good bit of low level CS.
    Systems is very high level (i.e. abstract) and more interesting if you want to get into "architect" type roles in any engineering discipline.
    Personally I'm doing a Bachelors in Robotics and then plan to do a masters in Cysec, if that works out.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Cybersecurity for sure.
      As long as there is a shit code there will be vulnerabilities, and this is where infosec comes in.

      Most cybersec is you work as a support role looking at packets captured by the SoC or doing incident response. Companies dont pay you to hack, they pay you to minimise liability at the lowest cost.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Infosec has lots of subroles to specialize in (blue and red alike). That is why it's so flexible to get into. If you don't like pentesting/redteam you can try blue side (lots more job opportunities like you said yourself).

        lol cybersec is a fricking meme now. you won't be able to do shit about insecure software, they don't teach anything about software in most cybersec degrees. just gay ass threat models or compliance . 95% of cybersec gays are basically business analyst no coders now

        Infosec is a large field, if you can't fix something doesn't mean you can't secure it or isolate it

        That all being said, going into ICT solely for the money is a bad choice. This industry requires you to develop your skills and learn continuously, if you don't like it you'll burn out VERY QUICKLY.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        lol cybersec is a fricking meme now. you won't be able to do shit about insecure software, they don't teach anything about software in most cybersec degrees. just gay ass threat models or compliance . 95% of cybersec gays are basically business analyst no coders now

        Security is great if you're a pentester. If you're not yeah it's gay as frick you end up as an "analyst", "strategy", or "compliance" guy who just makes powerpoints like every other fake-job office worker.

        t. pentester

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I completely agree. I have a SWE friend turned into a pentester back in 2018 and he absolutely loves it. but even he tells me that the field turned into gay shit compliance that makes it hard to reliably take jobs that are just BA even when they advertise "pentesting" as for some even pen testing means running compliance tools now too lol

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          There’s too many pentesters

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        my department has an offsec team. they do exist

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Systems engineers work like it's 1995, underpaid and overqualified
    >Robotics, same
    >CS is dead, Elon said so
    >Mechatronics is a meme, information science is fricking useless
    >Cybersecurity is impossible to get a job in unless you do military to get clearance

    Basically the only viable career path is janitorial work. Mops are the future.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Give up. I have a CS degree but work construction because there are no tech jobs (for white men) anymore

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    cyber, it's pretty comfy

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      What did they have you study in college? What do you learn?

      t. Want to minor in cyber security

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Not that guy but Botany. Degree doesn't matter except for getting past the HR roastie filter. Certs matter more in cybersec. After certs and some experience you need to give something back to the community whether that be publishing a cve, creating a tool, creating a write up for an attack chain, etc.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    what do you want? what do you think is coolest? what do you think you can handle? what do you think will provide the most value to the world and to yourself? are you seriously asking bot to decide your future?

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i have autism can someone analyze the face of the guy in the back? I know the pic is about him in some way. Is he sad?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I know the pic is about him in some way.
      it's not
      >Is he sad?
      ??????

    • 2 months ago
      sage

      Yes, because he girl is smiling at another dude and is about to ditch him. Which is bad because the photo was taken on Valentine's day, so the dude in the back will probably spend the night alone.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      wtf, do autists really?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Can’t you ask AI to describe what it sees in the image?

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >isn't CS a tad overblown?
    if you want to do anything software related, either a dedicated AI degree or just a math degree or maybe something related to data science would be better. programming you can just learn online. then just do some comp sci stuff as a minor
    seriously, something with lots of math will make you a God amongst codemonkeys

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      yeah, there's also a pure AI degree offered where I live, wondering whether it's just a cashgrab since it's rather expensive compared to applied math

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I'm in a pure AI degree now and half the classes are useless memes like Prolog and Bayesian networks taught by the crustiest boomers imaginable. These so-called graduate courses are less rigorous than Ivy League 200-levels due to the amount of business and linguistics majors in the program. If the degree is marketed as interdisciplinary or has no hard entry requirements to filter out these people: avoid.
        That said my thesis topic is really cool.
        I did math and physics before, (applied) math I would recommend but it's important also to do a lot of software projects

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Go with the one that combines Computer + Natural Science so Mechatronics it is then but mechatronics + information science is worse form of Mechatronics
    I'm waiting for the field that combines CS + All three natural science of biology, chemistry and physics aka the best chad engineer
    Its so sad that you legit can't even get legit pure rigorous computer science like the old days even MIT has regressed over the years
    Computer science ranking by pure rigor from top to bottom
    >.0001% Above S: CS + Tri Science (Bio+Chem+Phy)
    >.1%S: Mechatronics
    >10%A: Electrical Engineering , System Engineering, CS + Artifical Intelligence, Computer Science, Applied Maths with CS focus
    >50%B: Intelligent Systems, Robotics
    >50-70%C:Information Science
    >Lmao 90-100%D: Cybersecurity

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Cyber sec is the new auditing, don't do it

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Almost all programming jobs will be replaced by AI in the near future.
    If you choose something where you need to use your hands for building custom products that can't be built by machines, then you'll pretty much be set. Everything is going to change a lot, but some things won't change in the near future.
    Like building industrial control panels for example.
    Repairing industrial/factory machines.
    Building industrial machines.
    Building and repairing automatic farming equipment.(Where I live this is a very high paying job, due to its very specialized field and increasing demand)
    Machines that involves a PLC.
    These things are standardized and requires specialized knowledge and a certificate.

    For this you could become an Automation Technician / Automation & controls Engineer / Industrial Technician, or whatever it is called in the US.
    It's a highly specialized field that pays well and has job security far into the future. There's a huge and an increasingly rising demand for skilled workers and there are many sub-fields you can specialize in.
    If you get a job developing custom built machines in a small company then the work will be very varied and balanced between drawing wire diagrams, building Industrial control panels, wiring the machine and programming the PLC. It also feels very rewarding and meaningful. It feels like you're actually creating something useful that will benefit society.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >It's a highly specialized field that pays well and has job security far into the future.

      can confirm, I work in a different specialization of electronics and I've been thinking of going back to CC to do some of the PLC programming classes, those jobs pay quite a bit more than most electronics gigs. I bet they're just like the rest of electronics/trades, full of old boomer working retired's the corps are struggling to replace. People are waking up to the college meme so it may not be juicy forever but right now it's a career to be in

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Almost all programming jobs will be replaced by AI in the near future.
      every time i read this, it makes me laugh out loud. not because i think you're wrong or anything, but because YOU PEOPLE are just like an AI. when someone asks about programming, you look into your training data and pull out the answer "uhhh all programming jobs will be replaced by AI" like the good little AI that you are. again, im not saying you are wrong necessarily, nor am i saying that you are right. im just saying youre a fricking buffoon.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Now I'm not just saying that you're a buffoon I'm saying that you're wrong as well.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        wrong how?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Because the humans required to make such an ai would always be smarter than the ai.

          That is beside the point because humans already solve those problems and classify as ai.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Because the humans required to make such an ai would always be smarter than the ai.
            No, because an AI can draw upon the intelligence of millions and billions of humans.
            And even more than that, because it's the node connectivity that increases the intelligence.
            So the more specialized nodes there are, the more intelligent the network is.
            If you have 100 edge nodes and add 1 more edge node, then you'll be adding 100 new linked connections to that network, which increases the overall intelligence by more that 1%.
            If you take all the smartest humans in every field and teach an AI what they know, then it will be smarter than the single person in that field which taught it, because it will be able to draw on information from other fields as well and be able to stitch it together in new ways.

            Even so, if following your own logic, that an AI requires a human that is more intelligent than itself to be created, then if a very intelligent person makes an AI, then it can be copied and distributed.
            It means that all the people which are less capable than that particular AI can potentially be replaced by that AI.

            One person can then do the job of many people with the help of AI.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >be muh
      >run small-med ict install/maintenance biz
      >up to 10 employees, the missus does our books and 5 of us are tradies (sparky, carpenters, plumbers and boilermakers - welding)
      >2 software guys - a jeet and an aussie. The jeet is our goto
      >about 2 yrs ago a client is talking to muh about automation & ai
      >"You watch - you'll all be out f the jerb to robots & ai in a couple of yrs..."
      >we PD the jeet to do ai stuff as it comes up - happy to do so
      >we are literally turning clients away as we are so booked out. Not just for sw but installs.
      PROTIP: any sparky can do a cat5 gpo but not many can do a building in a day like we can.

      I do agree with the farm equipment - I have connections to the right to repair bunch and being able to run diagnoses on any heavy machinery comes at a significant per hour cost.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    That's me in the back.

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    some of these are quite similar while others are very different.
    i mean, cybersecurity is totally different from mechatronics. heck, mechatronics is basically an engineering degree, whereas cyberscurity is probably just mathematics + networking. right?
    you have to know what you want to get yourself into.
    but if you think you are smart enough to do anything, then just study either pure mathematics, or electrical engineering. because these two kind of supersede everything you listed.

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you have to ask frick off and do something else

  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Cybersecurity, they make the big bucks now and are actually hiring. Get a military contractor to pay for a master's degree in a different tech field afterwards though, some don't require you to join when you graduate, so it's just a free master's + pay and benefits during your study

  22. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    robotics and automation. computer science teaches you what code is. robotics and automation teaches you how to code.

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